Nepal: The Strange Bedfellows of Nationalist Politics

[The following three articles, from the Nepali bourgeois press, describe new twists and turns in the politics of the former kingdom and nascent republic.  The announcement of the move by the leadership of the CPN(M) may have some relation to Baidya’s recent trip to capitalist-imperialist China (countering the UCPN(M)’s embrace of relations with the aggressive-yet-comprador Indian  bourgeoisie). 

And the move also reflects the ongoing urban orientation of the CPN(M).  The masses of peasantry in the countryside will undoubtedly view this with dismay, as a further CPN(M) downgrading of the struggle against feudal relations–a struggle which has been repeatedly downgraded, marginalized, neglected and suppressed since the end of the People’s War seven years ago.  

On the other hand, there are feudal forces (landlords) who have indicated their love of this shift. 

And Baburam Bhattarai, speaking for the revisionist-cum-bourgeois “republicanism,” jumped on it immediately, condemning the “collaboration” of Baidya and Biplav with the king. (see the third article, below). 

With this, what has been characterized as the struggle of a revolutionary CPN(M) vs. a revisionist and neo-comprador UCPN(M) begins to reflect two competing forms of nationalism, one aligned with China, the other with India. 

This turn poses a significant challenge to genuine revolutionaries in Nepal, and to all who support the revolutionary struggle in the Himalayas: May the revolutionary peasantry, youth and former PLA fighters keep their independence and revolutionary mass orientation!   —   Frontlines ed.]

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Business Standard:  “Nepal: CPN-Maoist may join ex-king to protect ‘nationalism'”

Tuesday, July 23, 2013

CPN-Maoist, the breakaway faction of Nepal‘s Unified CPN-Maoist, today said that it could join hands with former monarch King Gyanendra for the sake of protecting “nationalism”.

CPN-Maoist Chairman Mohan Vaidya said that there could also be collaboration with the former king, “who carries true feelings of nationalism”.

66-year-old Gyanendra’s reign ended in 2008 when the Constituent Assembly declared Nepal a republic and abolished the monarchy.

At a function in Nuwakot district, Vaidya also said that there was no alternative to the formation of a greater front with all the nationalist forces including the former king on this issue. Continue reading

Deutsche Welle (German press) interview with Mohan Vaidya ‘Kiran’: “Nepal on the brink of another ‘people’s war'”

dw.de, 25 June, 2012

Political turmoil continues in Nepal after the break-up of the main party, the Unified Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist). Mohan Vaidya ‘Kiran,’ former senior-vice chairman of the party, tells DW about his political plan.

Mohan Vaidya “Kiran” is the former senior-vice chairman of the Nepal’s main party, the Unified Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist) and is founder of the split-off Nepal Communist Party (Maoist) faction.

DW: There are reports that you have parted ways from Nepal’s Unified Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist). Is this true?

Mohan Vaidya Kiran: Yes, this news is correct. The party was not talking about the interests of the common man. The achievements of the People’s War (the Nepali Civil War) that was fought for ten years have been forgotten by the party. Dreams of people were not fulfilled. That is the reason we have parted our ways and have formed a new party.

What will be the name of your party?

The name of my party is Nepal Communist Party (Maoist).

What did Prachanda, Former Prime Minister of Nepal, say on hearing your announcement about the split from the party? What was his first reaction?

It has been a couple of days since we last spoke to each other. He called me up during our national conference. He said that we should have a discussion one last time; He asked me to revoke the division of the party and stop it from splitting up. I clearly told him that that could not happen now. When we officially get separated is when I will speak to him again.

Did you also speak to the current prime minister of Nepal, Baburam Bhattarai? He is also a leader of the UCPN(M). What did he say to you?

I met him 3 to 4 days ago. He didn’t day much about it. When it comes to his political thought, he has more of a national vision. He wants to save the government.

The political party that received maximum public vote has split up. Don’t you think this step of yours will deepen Nepal’s political crisis?

There is a crisis in the absence of the executive and parliament; we have broken our ties with the largest political party, the UCPN(M). We will use this crisis to the benefit of the people. The old parliamentary system is what brought it on. We will try to turn this crisis into a revolution. Continue reading