How the Pentagon Removes Entire Peoples

The Past is Never Dead

by DAVID SWANSON, CounterPunch
US Military Bases In The Middle East. The Number Has Exploded Over The Past Decade. Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/the-15-maps-that-explain-the-world-in-2012-2012-6?op=1#ixzz2VY3KNvyr

US Military Bases In The Middle East. The Number Has Exploded Over The Past Decade.
Map from: http://www.businessinsider.com/

If we think at all about our government’s military depopulating territory that it desires, we usually think of the long-ago replacement of native Americans with new settlements during the continental expansion of the United States westward.

Here in Virginia some of us are vaguely aware that back during the Great Depression poor people were evicted from their homes and their land where national parks were desired.  But we distract and comfort ourselves with the notion that such matters are deep in the past.

Occasionally we notice that environmental disasters are displacing people, often poor people or marginalized people, from their homes.  But these incidents seem like collateral damage rather than intentional ethnic cleansing.

If we’re aware of the 1,000 or so U.S. military bases standing today in some 175 foreign countries, we must realize that the land they occupy could serve some other purpose in the lives of those countries’ peoples.  But surely those countries’ peoples are still there, still living — if perhaps slightly inconvenienced — in their countries. Continue reading

US building huge military base on Guam to contain China’s military buildup

[Some of the information in this article is out of date; more recent material has been posted at https://revolutionaryfrontlines.wordpress.com/2012/02/21/philippines-us-wants-to-setup-a-mini-subic-to-accomodate-rotating-american-troops-cpp/ — Frontlines ed.]

The Telegraph UK, 25 Oct 2010

The US is building an £8 billion super military base on the Pacific island of Guam in an attempt to contain China’s military build-up.The expansion will include a dock for a nuclear-powered aircraft carrier, a missile defence system, live-fire training sites and the expansion of the island’s airbase. It will be the largest investment in a military base in the western Pacific since the Second World War, and the biggest spend on naval infrastructure in decades.

A B-1B Lancer takes off from Andersen Air Force Base in Guam

A B-1B Lancer takes off from Andersen Air Force Base in Guam

However, Guam residents fear the build-up could hurt their ecosystem and tourism-dependent economy. Estimates suggest that the island’s population will rise by almost 50 per cent from its current 173,000 at the peak of construction. It will eventually house 19,000 Marines who will be relocated from the Japanese island of Okinawa, where the US force has become unpopular.

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has said that this could trigger serious water shortages. The EPA said that dredging the harbour to allow an aircraft carrier to berth would damage 71 acres of pristine coral reefs.  The EPA’s report said the build-up would “exacerbate existing substandard environmental conditions on Guam”.

Local residents’ concerns, however, have been sidelined by the US-China strategic competition. China has significantly expanded its fleet during the past decade, seeking to deter the US from intervening militarily in any future conflict over Taiwan, which Beijing claims as its own, and to project power across disputed territories in the gas and oil-rich South China Sea.

Beijing’s naval build-up is also intended secure the sea lanes from the Middle East, from where China will import an estimated 70-80 per cent of its oil needs by 2035 supplies it fears US could choke in the event of a conflict.  China has therefore invested in what are called its “string of pearls” a network of bases strung along the Indian Ocean rim, like Hambantota in Sri Lanka and Gwadar in Pakistan and in developing a navy which can operate far from home.

Experts agree China does not currently have the capability to challenge US supremacy in the Pacific and Indian Ocean. “China has a large appetite”, says Carl Ungerer, an analyst at Australian Strategic Policy Institute, “but it hasn’t got enough teeth”. Continue reading