Police posts to secure ore-rich Surjagarh hills

[The revolutionary people and their Maoist party are a major barrier to the capitalist development of India’s resources. The removal of the people by military means is a major focus of the Indian government.  —  Frontlines ed.]

This is in line with the Modi government’s stress on reducing dependence on imports and boosting domestic production.

 

A highly placed source stated that Surjagarh hills in Etapalli tehsil have police posts on their three sides, except northern side. An armed police post (AOP) at Hedri, on the south-eastern side of Surjagarh, is coming up fast on Gatta-Etapalli road. This would be the closest from Surjagarh being only around three kilometers away from the mining zone.

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India: Maoist bandh paralyses Narayanpatna

Bandh (shutdown) of Narayanpatna. Mass actions included downing trees to block roads.

KORAPUT/JEYPORE: The two-day bandh call by Andhra-Orissa Border Special Zonal Committee (AOBSZC) of CPI (Maoist) paralysed traffic in several areas of Narayanpatna on Friday.

Trees have been felled to disrupt traffic with communication from Laxmipur to Narayanpatna and towards Bandhugaon completely blocked. Though the bandh was called on short notice, the impact has been unprecedented in the backdrop of kidnapping of Jhina Hikaka. The mediapersons covering the event too are hauled up in the jungles of Naryapatana.

The Maoists are protesting the entry of military from Chhattishgarh and have demanded withdrawal of the forces. Besides, they have asked for a ban on liquor in tribal areas, land rights for tribals and closure of paramilitary forces camps in the region. On Thursday night, the Maoists had set construction vehicles of a contractor afire at Pendajam village under Semliguda police limits.

SP Avinash Kumar said the road blockade will be soon cleared.

Arundhati Roy on Indian Democracy, Maoists

The Wall Street Journal, May 24, 2011

By Krishna Pokharel

Writer and activist Arundhati Roy, winner of the 1997 Man Booker prize for “The God of Small Things,” is undoubtedly India’s iconoclast no.1. During the launch of her two latest books—“Broken Republic” and “Walking With the Comrades” —on Friday evening, she came to the defence of the military tactics of India’s Maoists in her polemical best:

“When you have 800 CRPF [Central Reserve Police Force, a paramilitary force deployed to fight country’s internal insurgencies] marching three days into the forest; surrounding a forest village and burning it and raping women, what are the poor supposed to do? Can the hungry go on a hunger strike? Can people who have no money boycott goods? What sort of civil disobedience we are asking them to adhere to?”

She backpedaled a little saying: “But at the same time what goes on in the forest in terms of resistance cannot go on outside the forest.”

In “Walking With the Comrades,” Ms. Roy recounts time she spent last year in the forest with the banned Maoist insurgents, who are active in large swathes of central and eastern India. In “Broken Republic,” she writes about the character of Indian democracy. Both books are published by Penguin India. Continue reading