Yemen: Anti-government protests have grown much larger than Saleh’s support

Yemen sees huge rival protests

AlJazeeraEnglish on Apr 15, 2011

Hundreds of thousands gather in Yemen’s capital Sanaa to show support for President Ali Abdullah Saleh.
But protests opposing his continuing rule reportedly draw millions to the streets of 16 provinces around the country, after religious and tribal leaders join calls for him to step down.
Hakim Almasmari, editor in chief of the Yemen Post, speaks to Al Jazeera.
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Thousands of Yemeni women protest over Saleh remarks
REUTERS, Sat Apr 16, 2011
By Mohammed Ghobari

SANAA (Reuters) – Thousands of Yemeni women protested in Sanaa and other cities on Saturday, enraged by President Ali Abdullah Saleh’s remarks it was against Islam for women to join men in the demonstrations aimed at toppling him.

The women, many clad in black Islamic dress with full face veils, said their role in protests was religiously sound and called on the president to step down in line with nearly three months of demonstrations demanding his ouster. “It seems that President Saleh failed in all his efforts to employ tribes and security to strike at those seeking his exit, and so he resorted to using religion, especially after he saw that thousands of women were taking part in protests,” said Samia al-Aghbari, a leader in the protest movement. Saleh, who has warned of civil war and the break-up of Yemen if he is forced out before organising an orderly transition, urged the opposition on Friday to reconsider their refusal to join talks to resolve the crisis in the fractious state. Continue reading

Algeria braces for more protests

Oil-rich country on high alert as opposition groups mobilise for weekend of rallies and gatherings calling for democracy

Friday 18 February 2011

Algerian riot police in Annaba, during last weekend's protests. Photograph: Moh Ali/AP

Protesters against Algeria‘s military regime are to hold further pro-democracy demonstrations on Saturday, despite the government’s promise to end the state of emergency that has gripped the country for 19 years.

The oil-rich Maghreb state has used its powerful security services to prevent it from being swept up in the tide of popular uprisings across the Arab world.

Last weekend, 30,000 police saturated the capital, Algiers, to prevent 2,000 people from demonstrating. Riot police blocked off roads, and harassed, beat and arrested hundreds of people who had gathered.

The government swiftly announced it would soon relax the emergency powers in place since 1992, which prevent public demonstrations. It has also promised new measures to ease unemployment and the housing crisis – symbols of the extreme social inequalities of a nation whose vast oil and gas riches are concentrated in the hands of a military oligarchy. Continue reading

Egypt Rocked by Deadly Anti-Government Protests

Video from Associated Press: Mass Protest Against Egypt Leader

January 25, 2011
Thousands of anti-government protesters clashed with riot police on Tuesday in the centre of Cairo in a Tunisia-inspired demonstration to demand the end of Hosni Mubarak’s nearly 30 years in power. (January 25)

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VOA News 25 January 2011

Thousands of demonstrators protest in central Cairo demanding the ouster of President Hosni Mubarak and calling for reforms, 25 Jan 2011

Thousands of demonstrators protest in central Cairo demanding the ouster of President Hosni Mubarak and calling for reforms, 25 Jan 2011 (Photo: AFP)

Thousands of demonstrators protest in central Cairo demanding the ouster of President Hosni Mubarak and calling for reforms, 25 Jan 2011

Egyptian police clashed with anti-government demonstrators as thousands took to the streets demanding an end to President Hosni Mubarak’s decades-old rule.

Officials say three people have died in the unrest. Two protesters were killed during a demonstration in Suez while a police officer in Cairo died from his injuries.

In Cairo, police fired tear gas and used water cannons Tuesday on rock-throwing demonstrators. At one point, demonstrators climbed on top of an armored police vehicle. Another protest erupted in Alexandria, where demonstrators shouted anti-Mubarak slogans.

The protests – reported by foreign media to be Egypt’s largest in years – began peacefully.

Egyptians have been calling for political and economic reforms in protests inspired by demonstrations in Tunisia that led to the ouster of that country’s president this month. The rallies are taking place despite government warnings that demonstrators could be arrested. Continue reading