Selma (the Movie) vs. the Strategy of Malcolm X

by tacticaldiversity, June 1, 2015

Last month many of us celebrated the 90th birthday of the one of America’s greatest revolutionaries, El-Hajj Malik el-Shabazz, also known as Malcolm X.  That his birthday follows his assassination date (February 21) on the calendar seems appropriate this year, as Malcolm could be said to be resurrected these days:  from condemnations of US racism at the United Nations, to self-defense against cops in NYC, to Black rifle clubs in Texas, to mass rebellion in Baltimore, to a growing disillusionment with the two-party system and doctrinaire nonviolence in America, he has seldom seemed more relevant.

This is all the more remarkable given that the representation of Malcolm in popular media is more distorted than ever.  2015 opened with the Martin Luther King biopic Selma giving us the most forgettable (perhaps the only forgettable) portrayal of Malcolm X in cinema history.  In some ways, the muting of Malcolm was inevitable; an accurate depiction of the Muslim leader presented a danger of upstaging King in the movie the same way that he often upstaged King in real life.  But that isn’t any excuse for the distortion of Malcolm X’s politics and the role he played in the Black freedom struggle.

In the short scene in which he appears, Malcolm comes literally hat in hand to Coretta Scott King begging to address the protesters and be a part of the movement.  He appears to have arrived uninvited, crashing a party he has no real place in.  As he offers to scare the segregationists with an “alternative” to MLK’s nonviolence, he hints that this is actually just a bluff because his “eyes see in a new way.”  Everything about this scene is fundamentally wrong: Malcolm explained himself to Mrs. King after, not before, he gave his speech—a speech which he was invited to give by the director of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee’s Selma Project.1  And when Malcolm spoke of offering an alternative to King’s pacifism, it was anything but a bluff.  Continue reading

SF Bayview Community Activist repeatedly arrested for protesting police abuse

DeBray Carpenter aka Fly Benzo, community activist and hip-hop artist, is again facing trumped-up charges for his outspoken opposition to the SFPD’s harassment, stalking, framing and brutality against the targeted Black community in the San Francisco’s Bayview District.  This time, he was assaulted by police for videotaping their military occupation tactics, and then they threw the book of trumped-up lies at him.  His next hearing will be in the San Francisco Hall of Injustice on Wednesday, November 16.

It’s Really Real TV: FLY Benzo – “War On Terror” // #BlackPOWER #DropTheCHARGES

FLY Benzo’s “War On Terror” Music Video… Filmed, Directed and Edited by Phil Jackson.. Black Power… United We Stand… Divided We Fall… STOP THE VIOLENCE.. START THE HEALIN’!!