London: A Call to Boycott India’s 63rd Republic Day and stand against sexual assaults on women

 DEMONSTRATE OUTSIDE INDIA HOUSE IN LONDON, Aldwych, WC2B 4NA.

11am to 1pm 26th January 2013

As India prepares to celebrate its 63rd Republic Day on 26 January 2013, Delhi is trying to come to terms with the recent gang rape of a young woman on a moving bus and her subsequent death. Such rapes have become rampant in the Indian cities and towns. Few months ago London Guardian commented India to be the worst country for women among the G20 nations. Indian rape laws are stringent enough; however, the executive and the judiciary are so much feudal and patriarchal that the conviction rate for rape cases in India between 2001 and 2010 was 26%. In the case of Muslim and Dalit women the rate of conviction is lmost nil as evident from the gang rape case of Bhanwari Devi in Rajasthan.

However a bigger dimension to this is that the Indian state itself has proved time and again to be the biggest perpetuator of rapes and all forms of assaults on women. State violence is institutionalised through a culture of institutional impunity to the police, the paramilitary and the army. In June 1984, hundreds of Sikh women were gang raped in the sanctity of golden temple by the Indian Army during ‘Operation Blue Star’. In the village of Kuman-Poshpura in Kashmir valley, about 100 women were mass raped by the Indian Army in a single night of 23rd Feb 1991. Hundreds of Muslim women were gang raped by security forces during the anti-Muslim riots in Gujarat in 2002, as the Chief Minister Narendra Modi just watched. The brutal gang rape and execution of 32 year old Thangjam Manorama in Manipur in July 2004 is another example of Indian Army’s ongoing repression on women in the North-East. Continue reading

The Rohingya “Palestinians Asia”

by filistina

Officially designated by the UN as one of the most persecuted communities in the world and referred to as Palestinians Asia, but few know their name.

The Rohingya have been subject to a program of ethnic cleansing supported by the Government of Burma (Burma). Despite their existence in Burma, dating from the 8th century, the Rohingya are condemned as “non-citizens” and “illegal immigrants”. Aimed as a result of religion and race, the Rohingya are suffering from oppression and discrimination they encounter in face of the Buddhist majority of Racine. The confiscation of land, forced labor and denial of the very basic human rights-including education, healthcare and marriage-are typical of the daily reality of Rohingya.

The injustice against the people of the Rohingya is deeply rooted in institutions and in the government system of Burma. Can be seen at 1982 Law on Nationality introduced the Burmese junta, which recognizes 135 ethnic tribes in Burma, and explicitly excludes the Rohingya. This legislation has received widespread condemnation for the biased nature and its incompatibility with international standards of human rights, including the right to citizenship.

This systematic denial of human rights, based on the refusal of the government of Burma to grant citizenship to the Rohingya, leaving them stateless in their own country. The denial of citizenship has been used as a tool to deprive Rohingya of their identity and their right to exist.

This severe marginalization and restriction of basic rights and fundamental freedoms, has forced the Rohingya to flee their homes in search of viable conditions. Therefore, between 1978 and 1992, some 200,000 Rohingya fled to save themselves from the tyranny of the Burmese army. Most fled to Bangladesh, where they remain as refugees. Life in Bangladesh proved not much improved since Bangladesh is one of the most densely populated countries in the world in which prevailing discrimination against ethnic minorities. Like Rohingya living in Burma, so the Rohingya refugees are restricted to traffic, often are exploited and their main resources are greatly limited. Also Rohingya women have often been victims of sexual violence in refugee camps. The hostility in Bangladesh has led epmenos Rohingya to seek refuge in other countries, such as Malaysia, Thailand and Indonesia, where they met but similar treatment. Continue reading

Thousands protest education cuts in London

Student tuition fees protest passes off peacefully

Student protests over university tuition fees and public sector cutsFew incidents reported as police appear to outnumber students and activists marching in protest against fee increases

Students protest over university tuition fees and public sector cuts. Photograph: Ray Tang / Rex Features

Thousands of students marched through central London on Wednesday to protest against fee increases and were met by large numbers of police but as darkness fell the demonstration appeared to be passing off peacefully.

As the protestors made their way through the City there were sporadic incidents involving bottles being thrown. Continue reading

Why Music Needs To Get Political Again

The Clash

The Guns of Brixton – video

by Billy Bragg

August 25, 2011

How ironic that The Clash should be on the cover of the NME in the week that London was burning, that their faces should be staring out from the shelves as newsagents were ransacked and robbed by looters intent on anarchy in the UK. Touching too, that the picture should be from very early in their career – Joe with curly blond hair – for The Clash were formed in the wake of a London riot: the disturbances that broke out at the end of the Notting Hill Carnival of 1976.

At the time, the press reported it as the mindless violence of black youth intent on causing trouble; now we look back and recognise that it was the stirrings of what became our multicultural society – the moment when the first generation of black Britons declared that these streets belonged to them too. Continue reading

LONDON AFIRE, by Mumia Abu-Jamal

10 August 2011
After decades of political betrayal by the Labour Party, and the blatant attacks on the working class by the Tories (the
British Conservative Party), there has emerged an angry and bitter class that has rocked what was once the center of a
global empire: London.

Fires have erupted In Birmingham, Croydon, Bristol, Liverpool and Tottenham at last count, sparked by the very same
fuse that lit the explosions of the 1960s, and 1990s: police violence-this time against a 29-year old father of four, Mark
Duggan.

But while this cop violence may prove a spark, that doesn’t mean it was the reason. Years of cutbacks, joblessness,
slashed educational opportunities and plain old political mean-spiritedness aimed at the poor and the dispossessed,
immigrants and the like, left sour tastes in the minds of many. Especially in the midst of a city that became the financial
center of Europe, who were living a life of excess and plenty. Continue reading

London: Mass condemnation of police killing of Mark Duggan

LONDON RIOTS – THE INCIDENT THAT CAUSED THE TROUBLE

RIOTS IN LONDON, POLICE CARS SET ALIGHT AFTER YOUNG FATHER SHOT BY

6 August 2011

BBC:  Riots in Tottenham after Mark Duggan shooting protest (news after BBC’s commercial)

BBC:  The BBC’s Andy Moore reports from behind police lines after a BBC satellite truck came under attack from youths throwing missiles–Petrol bombs have been thrown at police and three patrol cars, a bus and buildings have been set on fire in a riot in Tottenham, north London.  Eight injured police officers have been taken to hospital, at least one of them with head injuries.

The unrest began after a protest over the fatal shooting by police of 29-year-old Mark Duggan on Thursday.

About 300 people gathered outside the police station on the High Road after demonstrators demanded “justice”.

London Ambulance Service said a total of 10 people had been treated and nine had been taken to hospital.

Two patrol cars were set alight at about 20:20 BST but officers were not inside at the time.

Cdr Stephen Watson: “We had no information to suggest that we would have the scale of disorder that now confronts us” Continue reading

UK: Tottenham in flames as riot follows protest of police killing (Guardian)

Two police patrol cars, a passenger bus and several shops were attacked and set alight in north London as violence erupted

Tottenham riots

Riots erupt in Tottenham with police cars, a bus and shops set on fire. Photograph: Sky News

Two police cars, a bus and ­several shops were attacked and set ablaze in north London on Saturday night as violence erupted following a protest demanding “justice” over a fatal police shooting.

Officers on horseback and others in riot gear clashed with hundreds of ­rioters armed with makeshift missiles in the centre of Tottenham after Mark Duggan, 29, a father of four, was killed on Thursday.

At one point, rioters broke through police ranks and attempted to storm Tottenham’s police station, pelting officers with bricks, bottles and eggs. As a police helicopter flew over Tottenham High Road, youths in masks and hoods added combustible material to two burned out police cars, included a bundle of documents and an awning ripped down from one of the shops. Some attempted to persuade the rioters to disperse, one young man shouting: “Go home now people.”

But others filled bottles with petrol to throw at the police lines. Continue reading

Huge turnout in London for protest against austerity measures

About half a million people marched through the streets of central London to protest against government spending cuts.

March 26, 2011

Police officers and protesters clash on Piccadilly during marches in protest at government cuts on March 26, 2011, in London, England. (Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)

LONDON, U.K. — About half a million people marched through the streets of central London today to protest against austerity measures.Protesters wove past all the major tourist attractions — Big Ben, Trafalgar Square, Piccadilly Circus before reaching Hyde Park. Many marchers held signs paying tribute to the protests in Egypt — one read, “Rise up, Protest Like an Egyptian.” Other signs displayed British wit: “You are tightening your belts around our necks.”

It was the country’s largest demonstration since 2003, just before the invasion of Iraq, when a million people turned out in protest. Continue reading

London: Mass Protests by Students and Workers over budget cuts and fee hikes


December 09, 2010

The British parliament has just approved a bill to raise university tuition fees in England. The vote came amid mass demonstrations by thousands of students and trade unionists. It turned out the largest in a string of rallies against sweeping austerity measures and budget cuts across Europe. RT’s Laura Emmett is in London with the latest developments from the streets.

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British Parliament approves tuition hike despite widespread student protests

By Anthony Faiola
Washington Post Foreign Service
Thursday, December 9, 2010

LONDON – British lawmakers pushed through a controversial hike in university tuition fees on Thursday, even as tens of thousands of angry students took to the streets of London and across the nation in protest.

The vote had become the most divisive issue to face the seven-month old coalition of the Conservative and Liberal Democrat parties. The measure passed by a narrower margin than the government had hoped, with half of the lawmakers from the Liberal Democrats – the coalition’s junior partners – voting against it or abstaining.

Two Liberal Democrats and one Conservative lawmaker resigned their government posts because of their opposition. Continue reading

Activists protest in London over rape of Penan girls and women

By STEPHEN THEN

MIRI: International environmental activists from Survival International and Greenpeace demonstrated outside Oxford University in London Tuesday to protest against the rapes and sexual abuse of Penan women and girls in interior Sarawak.

These activists timed the protest to coincide with Sarawak Chief Minister Tan Sri Abdul Taib Mahmud’s visit to the university.

Taib was in London to attend the Oxford Global Islamic Branding and Marketing Forum.

Two days ago, Taib also spoke to some business people in London concerning investment prospects in the Sarawak Corridor of Renewable Energy (Score).

On Tuesday, Survival International director Stephen Corry emailed photographs of the protestors carrying banners and placards outside the Oxford building to the The Star.

”The protestors want the Sarawak Chief Minister to put a stop to the abuse of the Penans. Continue reading