Jim Crow lynchings more widespread than first thought, report concludes

 

 

Equal Justice Initiative report reveals history of racial violence and finds at least 700 more lynchings than previously recorded in southern states
In 1931, the Alabama governor called the National Guard to the Scottsboro jail to protect a group of young black men who he believed might be lynched after being accused of raping two white girls. Photograph: Bettmann/Corbis
Lauren Gambino, The Guardian, in New York, 

Tuesday 10 February 2015

In 1919, a black soldier returned home to Blakely, Georgia, having survived the horrors of the first world war only to face the terrors of a white mob that awaited him in the Jim Crow-era south. When the soldier, William Little, refused to remove his army uniform, the savage mob exacted their punishment.

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50 Years Ago Today: The Lynching of Three Civil Rights Workers in Mississippi

[The murder of three Civil Rights workers in Mississippi, 50 years ago today, who had devoted their summer, and whose lives were stolen in the dangerous work of dismantling, “overcoming”, the horrifying system of white supremacy, challenged many of us to join this struggle and to devote our lives to ending white supremacy — and, as we learned and as we grew, to overthrow the racist, capitalist, and imperialist system and all its horrors.  Many of our generation mark this day, June 21, 1964, as the point from which our struggle to end this rotten system “WILL NEVER TURN BACK!” — Frontlines ed.]

The 1964 murders of Schwerner, Chaney, and Goodman