Nepal: As leaders abandon revolutionary path, “disqualified” and disarmed veteran fighters prepare a new wave of struggle

Disqualified PLAs to enforce bandh

by TIKA R PRADHAN, Himalayan Times, 2012-02-21

KATHMANDU: A day after a section of the Young Communist League, youth wing of the UCPN-Maoist, announced that they would stage a sit-in at the party chairman Pushpa Kamal Dahal’s residence and the party headquarters, the struggle committee of the disqualified Maoist fighters today called an indefinite Nepal Bandh from March 4.

“Since both the party and the government paid no heed to our demands, we have no other way but to resort to indefinite Nepal Bandh,” said Krishna Prasad Dangal, coordinator of the struggle committee of the Former Disqualified People’s Liberation Army Nepal. “We will announce the struggle plan amid a press conference at Jana Sanchar Abhiyan tomorrow.”

Dangal informed that regional struggle committees would also organise press conferences and stage torch rallies before enforcing the bandh. Continue reading

Nepal Army to integrate disarmed Maoists into non-combat duties with symbolic officers

[The final dismantling of the (now disarmed) People’s Liberation Army–the main fighting force of the People’s War which was stopped in 2006–may be near, if the “establishment Maoists” and their partners in the government prevail over the revolutionary Maoists’ objections. — Frontlines ed.]

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Peace process: Parties close to deal on integration

PHANINDRA DAHAL, Kathmandu Post

KATHMANDU, OCT 20 – Though they failed to sign a deal on integration despite marathon negotiations on Wednesday and Thursday, the three major parties have struck consensus on integrating former Maoist combatants by forming a new directorate with a non-combat mandate as proposed by the Nepal Army.

The Maoist leadership consented to a non-combat mandate only after non-Maoist parties agreed that the directorate, apart from its initial mandate, could also undertake other responsibilities given by the state in the future. The Maoists had earlier expressed reservations over the limited mandate that included national level infrastructure construction, forest security, industrial security and rescue and relief operations prescribed for the directorate. Continue reading