Nepal: Chairman of new Maoist party, CPN-Maoist, details their situation, 19 June 2012

Comrade Kiran (Mohan Baidya) answered the questions raised by journalists during the press conference.

These questions and answers are from the press conference that was organized on the 19th of June 2012 by the newly formed Communist Party of Nepal-Maoist, which finally ruptured from the then Unified Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist) after a 2 day long National Convention held in Kathmandu, Nepal. Chairman of the newly formed CPN-M, Comrade Kiran (Mohan Baidya) answered the questions raised by journalists during the press conference. There is a minor edit for clarity.

The uncut-hour long audio of the press conference question and answer session can be found on the link http://soundcloud.com/ignitemagazine/cpn-maoist-first-press-meet-1 . Only useful to Nepali listeners.
Thanks to Comrade Pooja ( http://kalishakti.info ) for taking her time to make this speech available in English.
Q: – How do you justify the formation of the new party? How should general people understand this?
A: – Communist party is a party for the benefit of the proletariat and the people. In the case of Nepal, the aim of a communist party remains to move forward, raising the issues of safeguarding national sovereignty; people’s democracy and livelihood then ultimately leap towards socialism and communism. This is self-proven. In the process of attaining this aim we went through people’s war, and did considerable amount of work among and with the people. We built our base areas, practiced our newly formed people’s power but then conciliation took place amidst as we moved forward to build a new Nepal.
I’m not saying that we shouldn’t compromise, we should but while compromising, the act of abandoning our entire basis (achievements) has happened. The act of slipping down from our mission and objectives has happened. The dream we carried was of a constitutional assembly but where is the constitution? How did the constituent assembly function? Talking about people’s livelihood, how has the corruption been mounting-up? That fact is clearer. In the process of making a constitution there was an agreement to move forward institutionalizing the rights of the working class, indigenous people, ethnic minorities, women & dalit; including the rights of all oppressed class, region and gender but ditching all these primary issues of constitutional thematic committees it is apparent that ex-chairman, Prachanda surrendered everything to Congress & UML by forming a dispute resolution sub-committee under the constitutional committee.
In the process of making a constitution the question of ethnic-identity-based federalism is extremely important. Our party takes the decision of an ethnic-identity-based federalism while in process of restructuring the state Prachanda & Baburam joined their necks together with Congress-UML and agreed up on eleven anonymous federal states. The situation was that they were forced to take their decision back, as we and all others in the constituent assembly carried-out a signature collection campaign against their decision. They have failed to institutionalize ethnic-identity, it is important for us to do it.  Continue reading

Nepal: Maoist factions agree on two-pronged policy

Kathmandu Post: “Factions agree to adopt a ‘one party two tactics’ policy till May 27”

 KATHMANDU, MAR 24 –

The rival factions within the UCPN (Maoist) led by Chairman Pushpa Kamal Dahal and Vice-chairman Mohan Baidya have reached an informal understanding to move ahead adopting a “one party two tactics” policy till May 27, the extended deadline of the Constituent Assembly.

While leaders said they adopted such policy to keep the party united, some influential leaders from the Baidya camp have opposed the idea, arguing that they should form a separate party. Speaking to journalists a few days ago, Dahal had said that the party would neither split formally nor remain united.

Leaders from the hard-line camp—Ram Bahadur Thapa, CP Gajurel, Netra Bikram Chand and Hitman Shakya—are in favour of splitting the party before May 27. But Baidya and Standing Committee member Dev Gurung are against a formal split until May 27.

With such an understanding, the rival factions will function in a parallel way with their own political line. “The party will function in a parallel way till May 27 with separate policies and programmes,” said Haribol Gajurel, a Dahal confidante.

The establishment faction headed by Dahal and Prime Minister Baburam Bhattarai will engage on the ongoing peace and constitution-writing process, while the hardliners will make preparations for a possible revolt. Continue reading

Interview : Kiran Vice Chairman, Central Committee, Unified Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist)

Friday, 16 December 2011

Q. Your experience with the formulation of national constitution in the last two years and the resistance by the reactionary parliamentary right wingers like Nepali congress. How do you sum it up in retrospect?

A. Our experience of Constituent Assembly for the last two years and our co-work with parliamentarian parties, including Nepali Congress, has been very complicated and bitter. In this whole process, intense ideological struggle is going on between two mutually contradictory trends: whether to build a new national army by integrating PLA in a dignified manner or make them surrender by disarming them and whether to attempt writing people’s constitution with anti-feudal and anti-imperialist content or write a parliamentarian constitution based on status quo. In this struggle our party is becoming weaker day by day.

In this course, a serious two-line struggle is taking place on the evaluation of different compromises and agreements reached from the past to now.

Q. Indian Maoists, your counterpart from India, were skeptical over your participation in the parliamentary path without the overthrow of the then existent state structures. Your party chose to restructure the state apparatus by participating in the bourgeoisie state legislature. How do you see it in retrospect?

A. Our party had initiated and conducted the great people’s war to establish new democratic state power by destroying the old one. However, without accomplishing this task we took a course of compromise and adopted a policy of restructuring the state. We take it as our limitation and obligation. It is natural for the Indian Maoists to be skeptical of our party. Our party’s practice in the days to come will provide correct answer to the doubt that the Indian comrades have expressed or will justify its irrelevance or relevance.

Q. Your nation is sandwiched between two giant powers of the south Asia, i.e. India and china. Your party saw India as more harmful than China against your revolutionary tide. Later, Prachanda, your party chairman was becoming more friendly to India shirking anti Indian stance. How do you explain this duality?

A. Yes, our country is sandwiched between two giant powerful countries of the south Asia, like India and china. We want to maintain a good neighbourly relation and go ahead by honouring each other’s national integrity and reverence with both of these countries. There are various unequal treaties, including the treaty of 1950, between Nepal and India. But, there are no such unequal treaties with China. In this sense, we oppose the expansionist attitude of the Indian ruling classes. However, we are not opposed to Indian people. We want to abrogate unequal treaties and sign up the new ones that are based on common interest and mutual equality of both the countries. Continue reading

Nepal: Basanta on class struggle, revolutionary strategy, the international communist movement, and two-line struggle in the party

Interview with Basanta, Politburo Member, Unified Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist)

Tuesday, 13 December 2011

Q. You said there is class struggle in the making of the new constitution. Can you elaborate which classes are aligned in to Nepal to backwards from the marching forward and how it is reflected in the expression of the new constitution. How they are placed in different parties?  Which are the parties totally retrograde?

A. Constitution is a political document that guides the state power of the given country to drive forward. Like the state power, constitution is also relative to a certain class, oppressor or the oppressed. At one point of the people’s war, the Constituent Assembly came into being as a political tactic to drive forward the unfinished task of new democratic revolution in Nepal. The classes, which were fighting militarily during people’s war, are now clashing ideologically and politically in the Constituent Assembly. The front of class struggle has definitely changed but not the objective.

With the demolition of monarchy, feudalism has become weak in Nepal. The comprador bourgeois has acquired upper hand in the state power. However, the characteristic of the state power has not changed yet. The contradiction formed of the entire people of oppressed class, nation, region and sex on the one side and the comprador and bureaucratic bourgeoisie, which is leading the reactionary state power, on the other, is the principal contradiction. It is manifested now in the Constituent Assembly too. To write a constitution that paves the way forward to resolving the basic contradictions emerged out of semi-feudal and semi-colonial condition of Nepal and restructuring the state power accordingly is the task our party is trying to accomplish from the Constituent Assembly. However, two-line struggle seems to be sharp on the content of the constitution.

It is principally the class not a party, we are confronting with, in the Constituent Assembly. However, the ideological and political line of a party represents the interest of a certain class. In this sense, we have to struggle with the parties too. The Nepali Congress, a section of UML and some parties from Madhesh represent the interest of comprador and bureaucratic bourgeoisie and feudalism in Nepal. So we have sharp contention with them in the Constituent Assembly. Continue reading

CP Gajurel on the Political Situation in Nepal

Red Star. June 2010

Present political situation and policy of the Party

by C P Gajurel ‘Gaurav’

Present political situation is marked by various twists and turns and ups and downs. After the abolition of autocratic monarchy ruling over Nepal since last two and a half centuries, the contradictions of Nepalese are in the process of changing. This change in the contradiction has brought some new changes in political alliances and new conflicts. The political parties which made repeated commitments before the people of Nepal and at the international sphere, proved futile when the tenure of the Constituent Assembly(CA) nearly ended without accomplishing its job of writing a new constitution.

Though the term of CA has been extended for another one year, making new constitution is still a tuff job, because the diff erences among the major political parties remain unresolved and new issues of diff erences have cropped up regarding many questions related and unrelated to the constitution. This article has been prepared based on such political circumstances.

Why the Constituent Assembly?

Though the slogan of Constituent Assembly was first coined by then Nepali Congress during 1950’s when it was leading anti-Rana mass movement, but it was completely left out for the last half a century. Th is slogan was raised by C P N (Maoist), but at the different circumstances. The party identified the existing monarchy as the main obstacle for the development of the Nepalese society and worked out a tactical line of making alliance with all the political forces who wanted to get rid of the monarchy. Major slogan to forge such an alliance was Constituent Assembly. Continue reading

Nepal parliament deal ends political impasse

BBC NewsFriday, 28 May 2010

 

Maoists demanded prime minister resign

Nepal’s MPs have agreed to extend its parliament by up to a year, as reports suggest the prime minister agreed to resign to allow the deal to go through.

Maoist opponents had demanded Madhav Kumar Nepal’s resignation as part of the deal to avert political crisis.

The parliament, elected in 2008, had been due to expire on Friday.

However, the extension was agreed at the 11th hour by the Maoists and the ruling Communist Party of Nepal and Nepali Congress parties.

Dinanath Sharma, a spokesman for the Maoist party – the largest in parliament – was reported as saying agreement had been reached to form a new national consensus government.

The parliament, or Constituent Assembly, which was elected after a decade of civil war, faced a Friday deadline to write a new constitution to replace the interim version.

However, there had been disagreement over the details of the new constitution, which would pave the way for fresh polls. The parliament’s extension allows time for more negotiations. Continue reading

Nepal: UCPNM Central Committee Softens Stand on Constituent Assembly Extension

Himalayan News Service

KATHMANDU: The four-day-long central committee meeting of the Unified CPN-Maoist concluded today softening its stance on the extension of Constituent Assembly’s term.

Chairman of the main opposition party Pushpa Kamal Dahal said the central committee meeting has unanimously decided to extend the CA’s term on ‘consensus basis’.

“Time to amend the constitution has already expired,” he said during a press conference organised to publicise the CC’s decision.

Earlier, the politburo meeting of the party had set two conditions to extend CA’s term — government should step down and parties should amend the interim constitution to return to the consensus system from majority system.

Prachanda claimed that his party would hold the party opposing consensus responsible for dissolving the CA. He, however, claimed that his party would seek all options to save the party’s brainchild — CA. Continue reading