In Greece, austerity kindles deep discontent

[The continuing–and deepening–of the worldwide crisis of the imperialist system continues to elude  management and control by the imperialist’s economic and political strategists and managers.  Their intelligentsia and their mass media continue to portray the crisis as one of failed policies–and not as a crisis of capitalism.  The Washington Post–a major “liberal” media operation in service of US hegemony–has turned attention, once again, to the situation in Greece, which continues to unravel in both economic and political terms.  Their “analysis” of the  root causes and growth factors of the Greek (and European) anarchist movements ends up with some insights, but conclusions no deeper than the “wag of the finger, tip of the hat” of comedic lore. — Frontlines ed.]

By Anthony Faiola

Washington Post, May 13, 2011

"Measures meant to shore up the country’s finances have sparked protests that go beyond the bounds of normal civil disobedience and reinvigorated the anarchist movement." (Washington Post caption)

Athens — Already struggling to avoid a debt default that could seal Greece’s fate as a financial pariah, this Mediterranean nation is also scrambling to contain another threat — a breakdown in the rule of law.

Thousands have joined an “I Won’t Pay” movement, refusing to cover highway tolls, bus fares, even fees at public hospitals. To block a landfill project, an entire town south of Athens has risen up against the government, burning earth-moving equipment and destroying part of a main access road.

The protests are an emblem of social discontent spreading across Europe in response to a new age of austerity. At a time when the United States is just beginning to consider deep spending cuts, countries such as Greece are coping with a fallout that has extended well beyond ordinary civil disobedience. Continue reading

Sudanese police clash with students in Khartoum

Sunday January 30, 2011

By Khaled Abdelaziz

KHARTOUM, Jan 30 (Reuters) – Sudanese police beat and arrested students on Sunday as hundreds protested throughout the capital demanding the government resign, inspired by a popular uprising in neighbouring Egypt.

Heavily armed police patrol Khartoum’s main streets January 30, 2011. Police beat and arrested students in central Khartoum, witnesses said on Sunday, as demonstrations broke out throughout the city demanding the government resign. (REUTERS/Stringer)

Armed riot police broke up groups of young Sudanese demonstrating in central Khartoum and surrounded the entrances of four universities in the capital, firing teargas and beating students at three of them.

Some 500 young people also protested in the city of el-Obeid in North Kordofan in the west of the country.

Police beat students with batons as they chanted anti-government slogans such as “we are ready to die for Sudan” and “revolution, revolution until victory”.

Groups have emerged on social networking sites calling themselves “Youth for Change” and “The Spark”, since the uprisings in nearby Tunisia and close ally Egypt this month.

“Youth for Change” has attracted more than 15,000 members.

“The people of Sudan will not remain silent any more,” its Facebook page said. “It is about time we demand our rights and take what’s ours in a peaceful demonstration that will not involve any acts of sabotage.”

The pro-democracy group Girifna (“We’re fed up”) said nine members were detained the night before the protest and opposition party officials listed almost 40 names of protesters arrested on Sunday. Five were injured, they added. Continue reading

Egypt protesters defy crackdown

Anti-Mubarak protesters clash with police overnight across capital Cairo as government struggles to restore order.

al Jazeera, 27 Jan 2011

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Activists trying to oust Hosni Mubarak, the Egyptian president, are continuing to clash with police in the capital, Cairo, despite a government crackdown to end the unprecedented protests.

Al Jazeera’s Dan Nolan, reporting from Cairo, said there were “running clashes throughout Cairo” overnight and that while the situation was a bit calmer in the early hours of Thursday, more protests were anticipated during the day as the demonstrators are “just showing no signs of stopping so far”. Continue reading

Thousands call for ouster of Yemeni president

The Associated Press , Jan. 22 2011

ADEN, Yemen — Drawing inspiration from the revolt in Tunisia, thousands of Yemenis fed up with their president’s 32-year rule demanded his ouster Saturday in a noisy demonstration that appeared to be the first large-scale public challenge to the strongman.

Clashes also broke out Saturday in Algeria, as opposition activists there tried to copy the tactics of their Tunisian neighbours, who forced their longtime leader to flee the country more than a week ago.

The protests in Yemen appeared to be the first of their kind. The nation’s 23 million citizens have many grievances: they are the poorest people in the Arab world, the government is widely seen as corrupt and is reviled for its alliance with the United States in fighting al-Qaida, there are few political freedoms and the country is rapidly running out of water.

Still, calling for President Ali Abdullah Saleh to step down had been a red line that few dissenters dared to test. Continue reading