Algeria will donate their World Cup prize money to the poor in Gaza

 

Homecoming: The Algerian squad are paraded through Algiers on an open-top bus on Wednesday

Homecoming: The Algerian squad are paraded through Algiers on an open-top bus on Wednesday

By PAUL COLLINS, Daily Mail Online, 2 July 2014

Algeria forward Islam Slimani has revealed that he and his team-mates are donating their money to people in Gaza.

The north African side won the hearts and minds of many with their heroic effort in pushing Germany to extra-time in their round of 16 World Cup clash.

And now their display of generosity to the poor and needy in Gaza has further endeared the watching world.

Slimani, who plays for Sporting Lisbon, said: ‘They need it more than us.’ Continue reading

On the legacy of colonialism and the struggles against oppression today

[Nearly 50 years after the death of Frantz Fanon, the author of “The Wretched of the Earth,” this essay traces his legacy and relevance in the oppressive realities and struggles today.  Nigel Gibson, the author of this essay, presents a profound review of the reality of the imperialist stamp on the countries and peoples who have won national independence–but not social or human liberation.  The thinking and orientation of Frantz Fanon contributes much to people who are inexorably driven to challenge their ongoing oppression in the so-called “post-colonial” world.  The essay is long, but deserves attention from all whose lives and possibilities are framed by these questions. — Frontlines ed.]

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50 years later: Fanon’s legacy

by Nigel C Gibson

http://pambazuka.org/en/category/features/78860, Issue 564, 2011-12-21

When I was asked by Dr. Keithley Woolward to address the question of Fanon’s contemporary relevance, I was reminded of a blurb on the back of my recent book Fanonian Practices in South Africa: From Steve Biko to Abahlali baseMjondolo which reads, ‘This is not another meditation on Fanon’s continued relevance. Instead, it is an inquiry into how Fanon, the revolutionary, might think and act in the face of contemporary social crisis.’ My comments today should be considered in that spirit.

Frantz Fanon

‘Relevance’ ­ from a Latin word ‘relevare’, to lift, from ‘lavare’, to raise, levitate ­ to levitate a living Fanon who died in the USA nearly 50 years ago this coming Tuesday in cognizance of his own injunction articulated in the opening sentence from his essay ‘On national culture’: ‘Each generation must out of relative obscurity discover its mission, fulfil it, or betray it’ (1968 206). The challenge was laid down at the opening of this year of Fanon’s 50th (as well as the 50th anniversary of his ‘The Wretched of the Earth’) which began with revolution ­ or at least a series of revolts and resistance across the region, known as the Arab Spring.

Fanon begins ‘The Wretched’, as you know, writing of decolonisation as a program of complete disorder, an overturning of order ­ often against the odds ­ willed collectively from the bottom up. Without time or space for a transition, there is an absolute replacement of one ‘species’ by another (1968: 35). In a period of radical change such absolutes appear quite normal, when, in spite of everything thrown against it, ideas jump across frontiers and people begin again ‘to make history’ (1968: 69-71). In short, once the mind of the oppressed experiences freedom in and through collective actions, its reason becomes a force of revolution. As the Egyptians said of 25 January: ‘When we stopped being afraid we knew we would win. We will not again allow ourselves to be scared of a government. This is the revolution in our country, the revolution in our minds.’ What started with Tunisia and then Tahrir Square has become a new global revolt, spreading to Spain and the Indignados (indignants) movement, to Athens and the massive and continuous demonstrations against vicious structural adjustment, to the urban revolt in England, to the massive student mobilisation to end education for profit in Chile, to the ‘occupy’ movement of the 99 percent.

And yet, as the revolts inevitably face new repression, elite compromises and political manoeuvrings, Fanonian questions ­ echoed across the postcolonial world ­ become more and more timely. (How can the revolution hold onto its epistemological moment, the rationality of revolt?) Surely the question is not whether Fanon is relevant, but why is Fanon relevant now? Continue reading

Algeria braces for more protests

Oil-rich country on high alert as opposition groups mobilise for weekend of rallies and gatherings calling for democracy

Friday 18 February 2011

Algerian riot police in Annaba, during last weekend's protests. Photograph: Moh Ali/AP

Protesters against Algeria‘s military regime are to hold further pro-democracy demonstrations on Saturday, despite the government’s promise to end the state of emergency that has gripped the country for 19 years.

The oil-rich Maghreb state has used its powerful security services to prevent it from being swept up in the tide of popular uprisings across the Arab world.

Last weekend, 30,000 police saturated the capital, Algiers, to prevent 2,000 people from demonstrating. Riot police blocked off roads, and harassed, beat and arrested hundreds of people who had gathered.

The government swiftly announced it would soon relax the emergency powers in place since 1992, which prevent public demonstrations. It has also promised new measures to ease unemployment and the housing crisis – symbols of the extreme social inequalities of a nation whose vast oil and gas riches are concentrated in the hands of a military oligarchy. Continue reading

More than 400 arrested in Algeria at rally demanding reforms

A human rights activist says more than 400 people have been arrested during a pro-democracy protest that brought thousands of people onto the streets of the Algerian capital.

More than 400 arrested in Algeria at rally demanding reformsALGIERS, Algeria (Ahlul Bayt News Agency) – A human rights activist says more than 400 people have been arrested during a pro-democracy protest that brought thousands of people onto the streets of the Algerian capital.Ali Yahia Abdenour says women and foreign journalists were among those arrested during Saturday’s demonstration, which came a day after mass protests toppled Egypt’s autocratic leader.

Abdenour, who heads the Algerian League for the Defense of Human Rights, said some 28,000 security forces were deployed in Algiers to block the march and disperse the crowds.

Organizers of the march said 10,000 people turned out, but officials put the turnout at only 1,500.

Thousands of Algerians defied a government ban on protests and a massive deployment of riot police to march in the capital Saturday, demanding democratic reforms just a day after the same demands toppled Egypt’s authoritarian leader. Continue reading

Algeria opposition to hold protest, which officials have banned; possible clashes between police and demonstrators

“]

Many demonstrators in Algeria have been inspired by the events unfolding in Egypt and Tunisia

[Some have raised a question:  if the people’s victory in Egypt is not secure, then it is both real and illusory, and cannot be contained or consolidated in one country, but must be seen as an episode in the unraveling of an imperial matrix with many dangerous opportunities across the Arab world which can only be seized and won on an internationalist and Pan-Arab basis.  This is a debate that accompanies the power which is now finding its manifestation in the streets. — Frontlines ed.]

12 Feb 2011

Many demonstrators in Algeria have been inspired by the events unfolding in Egypt and Tunisia [AFP]

Thousands of police in riot gear were in position in the centre of the Algerian capital to stop a planned pro-democracy demonstration that could mimic the uprising which forced out Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak.  Continue reading

Algeria: Government denies any rights, spurring movement for democratic rights

Algeria warns opposition against banned protest

By AOMAR OUALI
Associated Press

ALGIERS, Algeria (AP) — The Algerian government warned Wednesday it will be the opposition’s fault if a pro-democracy protest later this month turns violent.

Opposition leaders, human rights groups, unions, students and jobless workers are planning a march Feb. 12 in Algiers, the capital. They want the government to lift the state of emergency that has been in effect since 1992, end its ban on new political parties and generally be more transparent.

But Deputy Prime Minister Nouredine Yazid Zerhouni reminded organizers Wednesday that the march is “officially banned.” Continue reading

With protests in several Middle East countries, there are also now fears for Algeria, Yemen and Syria

A demonstrator reacts in Tahrir Square in Cairo today. There are fears that the protests will spread

Wednesday 02 February 2011

By Harriet Alexander, The Telegraph (UK)

Algeria

President Abdelaziz Bouteflika, who has ruled the country since 1999, was elected on the promise to end the violence that had plagued the country for much of its history since independence from France in 1962.

To a certain extent he has succeeded, and after years of political upheaval the country is beginning to emerge as a centre of enterprise, heavily assisted by the country’s huge oil and gas reserves. It has estimated oil reserves of nearly 12 billion barrels, attracting strong interest from foreign oil firms. Continue reading